Bees

Honey bees are useful insects and fairly hard photographic subjects in the wild as they flit about from flower to flower.

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The bee picture below is one I’m most proud of. The bee was supping from the flower and hanging upside down as shown in the picture. Held still long enough for me to shoot just this one picture…

Bee Hanging From Flower

Some other bee pictures I’ve taken are shown below. First, as part of the Daily Macro project I had a picture of a bee climbing out of a Cala Lily. That one is shown here…

Bee Climbing of a Cala Lily…note the pollen on the bee’s leg.

Another day walking around I noticed some bees on red flowers. Not spectacular but a nice shot…

Bee On a Red FlowerThere is a Wisteria arbor outside my apartment patio. One day I was testing a long lens and this black bee started working the flowers that happened to be in bloom…

Black Bee on WisteriaFinally, for now, it was toward the end of the flower season for the Sumac and the bees were out trying to find the last of the pollen. This shot is not special for the flower which is rather ratty but for the expression on the bee. To me, this bee looks really evil…

Evil Looking Bee

Colophon

Hanging Bee: Taken 6 April 2011 with a Nikon D90 with AF-S Nikkor 18-105 Zoom set to 105mm using ISO-400 and f6.3 at 1/640sec exposure.

Cala Lilly Bee: Taken 22 March 2014 with a Nikon D90 with AF-S Micro Nikkor 105mm using ISO-320 and f8 at 1/4000sec exposure.

Red Flower Bee: Taken 17 June 2014 with a Nikon D90 with AF-S Nikkor 18-300 Zoom set to 300mm using ISO-1250 and f5.6 at 1/1000sec exposure.

Black Bee on Wisteria: Taken 14 June 2014 with a Nikon D90 with AF-S Nikkor 28-300 Zoom set to 300mm using ISO-400 and f/5.6 at 1/400sec exposure.

Evil Looking Bee: Taken 19 June 2014 with a Nikon D90 with AF-S Nikkor 18-300 Zoom set to 300mm using ISO-720 and f5.6 at 1/1000sec exposure.

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